Sunday, November 1, 2009

In which I post adorable photos of Halloween...


Although Halloween is not traditionally celebrated in Germany, it is increasing in popularity in the last few years. In saying that, trick or treating has not really seemed to catch on and Germans think that one can only wear spooky costumes (think white faces with blood dripping), but you can still find things to do here.

Our English language playgroup decided to have a little party which we attended. We got to dress up and hear Room on a Broom besides lots of spooky treats!



We also carved pumpkins. I saw that "Halloween pumpkins" were being sold at a few fruit stands.

Bode's look is priceless here.
He got the hang of it eventually!

Contemplating what to draw...


It turns out that we didn't really have a choice and if you look really carefully at the Scientist's hand above, you will see who we carved! (Props to the Scientist for his rendition of Baby Bird's obsession favorite character.)

The pumpkin on the right is ours and the pumpkin on the left was carved by some South African friends of ours. They made a spider face. Watch out for their mad pumpkin carving skillz! This was their first one! Super gemacht!


All in all, the feeling wasn't the same and I definitely missed the US at this time but we still managed to sneak a few American traditions in.

Happy Halloween everyone!

5 comments:

Afferent Input said...

Yeah, I have to admit the white faces with blood dripping from the mouth was getting a little bit creepy. Maybe it's just a Berlin thing, though...

C N Heidelberg said...

I read on a UK site that the British also think costumes should be creepy/scary in nature, and that cute costumes are an American thing!

Expats Again said...

We didn't have many trick-or-treaters here in Munich, so I missed seeing them, especially the little ones. Great costume & both pumpkins were excellent!

Mom said...

Those have to be the best, cutest pumpkins but I wouldn't expect anything different from you Danielle

seb said...

Keep in mind that there is also Karneval/Fasching/Fastnacht in Germany. That is the traditional "kids wear nice costumes in school" day over here. Halloween - though gaining popularity - is more seen as an festivity for adults and the novelty is the "spooky" or dark nature in contrast to the "old people's" Fastnacht... In this function it is also more and more replacing the own European Tradition of the Walpurgis Night (on April 30).